Yoga for Joint Pain Management

Healthy senior woman doing yoga at home

Exercise has been shown to be a pertinent part of managing joint pain and stiffness [1]. The whole point is to strengthen the area around the joint and alleviate tension build-up. If you’re looking for a gentler exercise routine to incorporate into your daily activity, yoga may be the movement for you.

“I often recommend yoga to my patients who want to stay active while managing joint pain,” says AROmotion’s founder, Dr. Robert Dean. “Don’t let appearances fool you, either! Yoga is a challenging exercise that requires focus from both the body and the mind. Even though your movements are low-impact and fluid, you’ll still get your heart rate up which is important.”

Yoga’s gentle movements make it an ideal exercise for managing joint pain. The flows and slow, intentional movements found in yoga have the ability to improve joint flexibility, strengthen muscles, and reduce tension [2]. Looking for a few that are easy to incorporate into any routine? We’re sharing three of our favorites below.

Cat-Cow

The Cat-Cow pose is ideal to open up the shoulders and stretch the spine. Not only does this beginning movement increase mobility in the spine, but it also strengthens and stretches your hands and wrists.          

Forward Fold

This pose focuses on the hip joints and can help with stiff muscles. When standing up and bending forward, this gentle stretch will strengthen both your hips and knees while working on that flexibility! [3

Bound Angle Pose

Known as a cool-down pose, the bound angle pose offers the ability to open the hips and strengthen knee joints. By placing your feet together while sitting and bending the knees, you’ll reap the benefits after a few minutes.

Just like any exercise program, consult your doctor on what movements will work best and safely for you.

If knee, hip, or shoulder pain is stopping you from enjoying your favorite exercises or activities, AROmotion may be able to help.  Contact us today to schedule a free consultation to find out if you are a candidate for our minimally invasive procedure that stops joint pain fast with effective and lasting results.

Dr. Dean’s Daily Stretching Routine for Joint Pain

Active Senior Couple Stretching

Stretching is an important part of any daily exercise routine, and especially so as we age. As our joints take on normal wear and tear with the passing of time, daily stretching can help maintain and increase joint movement, relieve muscle tension, and reduce the risk of injury from daily tasks and workouts.

“For my patients with joint pain and limited mobility, I always recommend daily stretching to help manage the pain while and allow for greater movement,” says AROmotion’s founder, Dr. Robert Dean. “Stretching is also a simple way to help prevent injuries that can complicate an existing joint condition.”

According to Dean, it’s important to stretch the entire body and not just the areas affected by joint pain. “If you are living with chronic joint pain, the last thing you need is a new injury in another area of the body to manage. By stretching your body from head to toe, you’ll reduce that risk.”

If you need some inspiration for your daily stretching routine while managing joint pain, here’s Dr. Dean’s favorite daily routine that he often shares with his patients:

Neck Rolls. This stretch can be done sitting or standing with the back straight for optimal posture. Tilt your head to one side and feel the gentle stretch on the opposite side of your neck. Breathe in and roll your head to the other side to stretch. Repeat this move up to 10 times or until you feel a release of tension in your neck.

Shoulder Rolls. Next, while maintaining proper posture, roll your shoulders up towards your ears and then back as you pinch your shoulder blades together. Repeat 10 times while breathing in and out deeply.

Arm Criss-Cross. Again, maintain your proper posture while standing or sitting and hook your right arm with your left forearm to form a “T” while pulling the right arm in towards you left shoulder. Breathe into the stretch and hold for several seconds. Repeat on the other side, then repeat the set up to 5 times.  

Side Stretch. Raise your right arm over your head, keeping that posture, and bend sideways at the waist until you feel a good stretch in your right side. Breathe in and out, then repeat on the other side. Repeat the set up to 5 times.

Toe Touches. This move is best done while standing, but if your mobility is limited it can also be done while seated. Slowly roll your head down towards your chest and continue to drop down towards your toes. Feel the stretch in the back of your legs and be sure to stop before it becomes uncomfortable. Hold for several seconds, roll up slowly, and repeat up to 5 times.

Forward-Bending Hamstring Stretch. Sit down with your back straight and your head pulling towards the ceiling. Place your right leg directly out in front of you with your foot flexed and slowly bend forward with a flat back as far as you can. Breathe in and out of the stretch, roll back up slowly, and repeat on the other side. Repeat the set 5-10 times.

Seated Glute and Sciatica Stretch. Next, place your right foot on top of your left knee and sit up straight, head pointed towards the ceiling. Grip the sides of the chair with your hand, keep a flat back, and lower slowly from the waist to feel a stretch across your sciatic nerve and into your glutes. Breathe in and out and hold for several seconds. Come up slowly, repeat on the other side, then repeat the set 3-5 times. If you have a lot of tension in this area, you may want to hold the stretch for longer while making sure to listen to your body regarding how far down to bend.

Foot Circles. Finally, show your feet a little love with this move! Again, while seated, extend your right foot out directly in front of you and move your foot from the ankle in a clockwise circle 8 times. Then, move the foot counterclockwise 8 times. Repeat on the other side, then you can repeat the set 3-5 times as needed.

“This simple routine can be done from the comfort of your home, sitting or standing, and best of all it doesn’t take that long,” says Dr. Dean. “The most important thing is to listen to your body! Don’t push past your own limits. Stretching should feel good and release tension, so when you start to feel pain or discomfort – that’s your body’s signal to not push the stretch further. And remember, you will become stronger and more flexible with time”

If you are living with chronic knee, hip, or shoulder pain that’s preventing you from daily tasks and activities, you can complete the form below to request your free consultation with Dr. Dean to see if you are a candidate for AROmotion which has helped more than 2,000 patients stop their joint pain fast without surgery.

Simple At-Home Shoulder Pain Exercises

Healthy senior couple holding each other's shoulders

Maintaining a strong and healthy upper body as we age is one of the keys to reducing inflammation and pain in our shoulder joints. But, as we get older, it can become difficult to do traditional upper body exercises which tend to rely heavily upon using weights and weight resistance to build up strength. At AROmotion, we believe that daily movement is one of the pillars to maintaining healthy joints as well as overall health and wellness. We also know that exercises have to be modified based on age, experience, and other health factors – which is why we are sharing these simple at-home shoulder pain exercises that can be modified based to fit your particular needs while reducing the risk of injury.

First, let’s get to know the anatomy of the shoulder courtesy of the Arthritis Foundation. The shoulder is made up of three bones: the scapula (shoulder blade), clavicle (collarbone), and humerus (upper arm bone). Two joints in the shoulder allow it to move: the acromioclavicular joint, where the highest point of the scapula (acromion) meets the clavicle, and the glenohumeral joint. The glenohumeral joint is the one most people think of as the shoulder joint. It is formed where a ball (head) at the top of the humerus fits into a shallow cuplike socket (glenoid) in the scapula, allowing a wide range of movement. The surfaces of the bones where the ball and socket meet are covered with smooth, elastic cartilage that absorbs shock and allows the joint to move easily.

The human shoulder

Your shoulders carry a lot of weight, both figuratively and literally, which is why keeping them strong and healthy over time is so important to your long-term wellness. That said, it’s also important to build up strength when starting to do shoulder exercises to help ease the pain so you don’t cause strain or damage. We love these simple at-home shoulder pain exercises because each one can be modified with different weights and the number of reps.

As with any new exercise routine, please consult with your doctor before getting started and do not push your body past its limits. Remember, you will build up strength and flexibility over time.

Warm Up with Shoulder Rolls

This simple movement will help warm up your muscles and shoulder joints and prepare for more challenging movements ahead. You can do this warm-up seated or standing, with or without hand weights. If using hand weights, we suggest starting as light as possible as you build up your strength. Here’s how to do it:

  • Place your feet hip-distance apart and firmly on the ground, whether you are standing or seated.
  • If using hand weights, hold them securely but without too tight of a grip that may become uncomfortable.
  • Roll your shoulders up towards your ears and take a deep breath in. Then, roll them back, feeling the stretch in your upper back, and exhale.
  • Do one set of 10, then take a break, and repeat if desired and/or able.

Up-Down Shoulder Lifts

This exercise combines traditional shoulder presses with alternating, lower impact movement so your muscles will not tire as quickly. This can also be done seated or standing, with or without hand weights.

  • If using weights, bring your hands up to your shoulders, then lift your arms straight up to the ceiling. Move slowly as you return your hands to your shoulders, taking care to breathe in and out during the movement.
  • Next, drop your arms down straight towards your side slowly, again taking note of your breath, and then move them back up to your shoulders.
  • Repeat the sequence 10-20 times based on your comfort level.

The Shoulder Row

This movement works the arms, shoulders, and upper back and can be done seated or standing, with or without hand weights.

  • Lean forward with a flat back, imagining that someone is pulling a string from your head towards the wall in front of you and from your back towards the wall behind you.
  • Stick your arms out straight ahead and slowly pull them back, keeping your elbows close to your body like you are rowing a boat. Pull back while taking a deep breath in until you can feel your shoulder blades moving closer together, being careful not to over-extend yourself.
  • Slowly move your arms back to your starting position while exhaling.
  • Repeat this movement 10-20 times depending on your comfort level.

Cross Over Shoulder Stretch

Now that you’ve given your shoulders a good workout, it’s time to show them some TLC with a nice, finishing stretch that should be done without hand weights.

  • Whether seated or standing, take a deep breath in and cross one arm over your chest, hooking it with the elbow crease of your opposite arm.
  • Breathe in and out while you feel the stretch and hold for 10-20 seconds.
  • Repeat the movement on the opposite side.
  • You can repeat the sequence 3-5 times or until you feel you’ve achieved a good cool-down stretch.

This simple, low-impact sequence is the perfect way to start a daily shoulder pain exercise routine. Over time, you should notice an increase in your shoulder strength and flexibility which can help decrease shoulder pain from normal, daily wear and tear. If you are experiencing shoulder pain that is not improving from exercises, you should talk with your doctor about your treatment options. Our Board-Certified Physicians are also here to help and can offer a  free consultation to see if you are a candidate for our non-surgical, FDA-approved procedure to treat knee, hip, and shoulder pain. Just fill out the form below and an  AROmotion team member will contact you.

By entering your information and clicking Submit, you are consenting to be contacted by our company representatives by phone, email, text/SMS, and through the use of automatic telephone dialing systems and prerecorded messages at the number(s) and email address(es) listed above even if your number provided on the form above is on a National or State Do Not Call List. Your consent does not require you to purchase any goods and/or services and you understand that you are not required to sign this authorization to receive services.

Low-Impact Hip Pain Exercises for Strength and Flexibility

Healthy senior couple stretching outdoors

Did you know that the hip joint is one of the most common sites of joint pain and osteoarthritis? This is because we rely so much on our hips to carry our body weight and manage basic, daily movements such as walking and running. That’s why it’s so important to maintain hip strength and flexibility as we age. However, if you are experiencing hip pain as you age it may seem too difficult to give your hips the exercise that they need each day. In this article, we will share some simple, low-impact hip pain exercises that you can do at home to help build up strength and flexibility.

First, let’s get to know our hips a little bit better! The hip joint is a “ball-and-socket” synovial joint, which means it allows for a wide range of motion. Each hip joint is responsible for bearing the weight and managing the movement of the lower half of each side of the body.  Healthy hip joints are able to accommodate more intense movements such as running or jumping. When hip joints are weakened and/or inflexible, which can happen over time from prolonged sitting or lack of exercise, it becomes more difficult for them to perform their daily functions without strain or discomfort.

By keeping your hip joints strong and flexible, you are helping them keep up with your body’s needs as you age. When your hip joints are in good shape, you can enjoy a larger range of pain-free motion while reducing the inflammation that can cause arthritis. That said, it is important to modify hip exercises as you age based on your body’s specific needs so you don’t overexert your hip joints while you build up strength and flexibility over time.

We love these low-impact hip pain exercises because they are great for everyone regardless of age and exercise experience. When you start with low-impact movements like these, you can build up strength and flexibility over time without putting additional strain on your hip joints. And, these exercises can be done from the comfort of your own home!

As with any new exercise routine,  please consult with your doctor before getting started and do not push your body past its limits. Remember, you will build up strength and flexibility over time.

Butterfly Pose

Woman doing butterfly pose

This is a great warm-up for your hip pain exercise routine because it helps open up the hip flexors while engaging your thigh muscles. Don’t be intimidated by the photo – it’s OK to start with your knees higher off the ground because you will be able to move them close towards it as you build up flexibility. Here’s how to do it:

  • Sit on the floor (use a pillow if needed) and press the soles of your feet together.
  • Imagine a string pulling your head up to the sky, elongating your spine while keeping it straight and tuck in your chin.
  • Breathe in and out deeply, and with each breath let yourself sink more into the stretch.
  • Continue to breathe in and out for at least 30 seconds to start, up to a full minute with experience, then repeat 2-4 more times.

Knee Hugs

Woman doing knee hugs on floor

Next, move on to knee hugs which will combine deep breathing with subtle lower body movement to continue warming up your hips:

  • Lie on the floor (use a mat or towel if needed), knees bent, and feet flat on the floor.
  • Slowly bend in one knee towards your chest, grab hold and pull towards you. You can also place your legs straight out in front of you if you are a little more flexible.
  • Breathe in and out from the stomach as you hold the stretch for 10-15
  • You can repeat 2-3 times on the same side then switch to the other side, or alternate sides based on your preference.

Hip Marching

Woman doing seated hip exercise

Grab a chair and get ready to take things up just a notch! This simple seated exercise helps strengthen your hips while also engaging your thighs and abs.  (Directions courtesy of Eldergym).

  • Sit in a chair with feet flat on the floor.
  • Lift up your right knee as high as is comfortable while taking a deep breath in, then lower your leg back to the ground while exhaling.
  • Alternate lifting your knees for a total of 10 lifts on each leg.

Standing Hip Extension

Woman doing standing hip exercise

Now, stand up and get behind your chair for the final part of this hip pain exercise sequence:

  • Grab the back of the chair with both hands and stand tall, being sure to straighten your spine and not arching your lower back.
  • Lift your right leg back, directly behind you, as far as you can without causing discomfort and hold for 5-10 seconds.
  • Return to your starting position and repeat 5-10 times on the same side before switching to the other side.
  • If you are more advanced and want more of a challenge, you can add a resistance band around your ankles.

This simple, low-impact sequence is the perfect way to start a daily hip pain exercise routine. Over time, you should notice an increase in your hip strength and flexibility which can help decrease hip pain from normal, daily wear, and tear. If you are experiencing hip pain that is not improving from exercises, you should talk with your doctor about your treatment options. Our Board Certified Physicians are also here to help and can offer a  free consultation to see if you are a candidate for our non-surgical, FDA-approved procedure to treat knee, hip, and shoulder pain. Just fill out the form below and an  AROmotion team member will contact you.

By entering your information and clicking Submit, you are consenting to be contacted by our company representatives by phone, email, text/SMS, and through the use of automatic telephone dialing systems and prerecorded messages at the number(s) and email address(es) listed above even if your number provided on the form above is on a National or State Do Not Call List. Your consent does not require you to purchase any goods and/or services and you understand that you are not required to sign this authorization to receive services.